partial  
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partial - A part of a whole. Incomplete.

A carnival charges a $15 admission price. Each game at the carnival costs $4. How many games would a
A carnival charges a $15 admission price. Each game at the carnival costs $4. How many games would a person have to play to spend at least $40? Let g be the number of games. The Spend function S(g) is: S(g) = Cost per game * number of games + admission price S(g) = 4g + 15 The problem asks for g when S(g) is at least 40. At least is an inequality using the >= sign: 4g + 15 >= 40 To solve this inequality for g, we type it in our search engine and we get: g >= 6.25 Since you can't play a partial game, we round up and get: [B]g >= 7[/B]

A cup of coffee cost $4 and a cup of tea cost $3.50. If ray has $40 and has bought 6 cups of coffee,
A cup of coffee cost $4 and a cup of tea cost $3.50. If ray has $40 and has bought 6 cups of coffee, find the maximum cups of tea he can buy [U]Calculate total coffee spend:[/U] Total coffee spend = Cost per Cup of Coffee * Cups of Coffee Total coffee spend = 4 * 6 Total coffee spend = 24 [U]Calculate remaining amount to be spent on tea:[/U] Remaining tea money = Starting Money - Total Coffee spend Remaining tea money = 40 - 24 Remaining tea money = 16 [U]Calculate cups of tea Ray can buy:[/U] Cups of tea Ray can buy = Remaining Tea money / Cost per cup of tea Cups of tea Ray can buy = 16/3.50 Cups of tea Ray can buy = 4.57142857143 Since Ray can't buy partial cups, we round down and we get: Cups of tea Ray can buy = [B]4[/B]

A pound of popcorn is popped for a class party. The popped corn is put into small popcorn boxes that
A pound of popcorn is popped for a class party. The popped corn is put into small popcorn boxes that each hold 120 popped kernels. There are 1,600 kernels in a pound of unpopped popcorn. If all the boxes are filled except for the last box, how many boxes are needed and how many popped kernels are in the last partially filled box? Using modulus calculator, we know [URL='https://www.mathcelebrity.com/modulus.php?num=1600mod120&pl=Calculate+Modulus']1600 mod 120[/URL] gives us [B]13 full boxes[/B] of unpopped popcorn. We also know that 13*120 = 1,560. Which means we have 1,600 - 1,560 = [B]40[/B] popped kernels left in the last box. FB Live: [URL='https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FMathCelebrity%2Fvideos%2F10156733590718291%2F&show_text=0&width=560']https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https://www.facebook.com/MathCelebrity/videos/10156733590718291/&show_text=0&width=560[/URL]

A town has a population of 50,000. Its rate increases 8% every 6 months. Find the population after 4
A town has a population of 50,000. Its rate increases 8% every 6 months. Find the population after 4 years. Every 6 months means twice a year. So we have 4 years * twice a year increase = 8 compounding periods. Our formula for compounding an initial population P at time t is P(t) at a compounding percentage i: P(t) = P * (1 + i)^t Since 8% is 0.08 as a decimal and t = 4 *2 = 8, we have: P(8) = 50000 * (1.08)^8 P(8) = 50000 * 1.85093 P(8) = 92,546.51 Since we can't have a partial person, we round down to [B]92,545[/B]

Basic Math Operations
Free Basic Math Operations Calculator - Given 2 numbers, this performs the following arithmetic operations:
* Addition (Adding) (+)
* Subtraction (Subtracting) (-)
* Multiplication (Multiplying) (x)
* Long division (Dividing) with a remainder (÷)
* Long division to decimal places (÷)
* Partial Sums (Shortcut Sums)
* Short Division
* Duplication and Mediation

How many 8$, tickets can I get for 100$
How many 8$, tickets can I get for 100$ Tickets = Total Money / price per ticket Tickets = 100/8 Tickets = [B]12.5 [/B] If the problem asks for a whole number, this means you cannot have a partial ticket. Therefore, we round down to [B]12 tickets[/B]

Partial Quotient
Free Partial Quotient Calculator - Divides 2 numbers using the Partial Quotient

Partial Sum
Free Partial Sum Calculator - Calculates a partial sum for 2 numbers.

Prove 0! = 1
Prove 0! = 1 Let n be a whole number, where n! represents the product of n and all integers below it through 1. The factorial formula for n is: n! = n · (n - 1) * (n - 2) * ... * 3 * 2 * 1 Written in partially expanded form, n! is: n! = n * (n - 1)! [U]Substitute n = 1 into this expression:[/U] n! = n * (n - 1)! 1! = 1 * (1 - 1)! 1! = 1 * (0)! For the expression to be true, 0! [U]must[/U] equal 1. Otherwise, 1! <> 1 which contradicts the equation above

Prove 0! = 1
[URL='https://www.mathcelebrity.com/proofs.php?num=prove0%21%3D1&pl=Prove']Prove 0! = 1[/URL] Let n be a whole number, where n! represents: The product of n and all integers below it through 1. The factorial formula for n is n! = n (n - 1) (n - 2) ... 3 2 1 Written in partially expanded form, n! is: n! = n (n - 1)! [SIZE=5][B]Substitute n = 1 into this expression:[/B][/SIZE] n! = n (n - 1)! 1! = 1 (1 - 1)! 1! = 1 (0)! For the expression to be true, 0! [U]must[/U] equal 1. Otherwise, 1! ? 1 which contradicts the equation above [MEDIA=youtube]wDgRgfj1cIs[/MEDIA]

Sarah has 85 dollars. She wants to get books. Each book costs 6 dollars. How much books will she be
Sarah has 85 dollars. She wants to get books. Each book costs 6 dollars. How much books will she be able to get? 85 dollars / 6 dollars per book = 14.17 We can't get partial books, so we round down to [B]14 books[/B]